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https://alphauniverseglobal.media.zestyio.com/Alpha-Universe-Camera-Disinfecting-1.be110857376e1c1dc5afaa178864837f.jpg

How Do I Clean & Disinfect My Camera Gear

In the kind of comprehensive blog posts Roger Cicala of LensRentals is known for, he goes through his recommendations for cleaning and disinfecting your camera gear and studio. While cautioning that the steps and information in his post are his thoughts and opinions at this moment in time, Cicala is better authority than most to author a post on the topic. "I’m qualified to talk about this subject to some degree," he writes "I take care of a ton of camera equipment, and I was a physician in my past life. And I’ve had so many requests for information about this that it seems logical to put something out, so everyone has access to it."

Cicala's post describes which household cleaners to use on your various photo gear (cameras, lenses, studio equiment, etc) as well as in and around your shooting space. He also notes that most gear is pretty easy to fully disinfect, but because camera bodies present special challenges, the best practice starts prevention—don't share your camera with someone else.

With so many questions and confusion about the COVID-19 coronavirus, we found Cicala's post to be as thoughtful as it is calming. "So there’s one thought for you," he writes, "if the gear hasn’t been touched or breathed on in 24 hours, it’s almost certainly safe; at 72 hours, you can take off the almost." 

You can see the full post on the LensRentals blog

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