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Some Things Don't Go As Planned...This Is How A Pro Makes It Work

Rick Wilking is a seasoned photojournalist celebrating his 40th year in the business. DPReview.com recently sat down with Wilking to discuss his approach to photography and the purpose behind his work. 

"The best pictures come from subjects who are comfortable with you being around. My approach has always been: you don't even put your camera to your eye until you've talked to that person. And then you're going to get way better pictures than if you just sort of go marching in and just shooting," says Wilking.

An avid Sony camera fan, Wilking has used the advancing technology to stay ahead of the very competitive photojournalism game. His first Sony camera was the α7. Once the α7R II came into play, he bought several of those and used them to cover last year's presidential campaign. Now? Wilkins is all about the α9 life.

"I quickly learned there were many, many advantages to the camera way beyond the form factor. To go from the DSLR to the mirrorless was a big change. I wanted the 1DX for its high-speed motor, but I wanted the 5D for its size. The α9 is both in one box."

They also followed along to document him on an assignment – one that he thought he had completely planned out.

In the video, Wilking takes off to Guernsey, Wyoming to cover the reactions to the eclipse in its path of totality. Equipped with four α9s, two remote cameras and two cameras around his neck, Wilking shows us how sometimes you just can't plan for everything. Watch the video below of Rick "catching the moment" – what he says has always been the mantra of photojournalism.