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Best Of 2021: Our Most Meaningful Photos Of The Year, Part 3

This week we're counting down to the end of the year with a selection of photos taken by the Sony Artisans Of Imagery and Alpha Imaging Collective along with the story behind each one. See Part 3 below and stay tuned to Alpha Universe this week for more.

Photo by Stan Moniz. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 15-sec., f/6.3, ISO 800

Photo by Sapna Reddy. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 12-24mm f/4 G. 1-sec., f/22, ISO 100

Photo by Autumn Schrock. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master.

Photo by Pete-McBride. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 25-sec., f/5, ISO 10000

Photo by Don Smith. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G + 2XTC. 1/60-sec., f/16, ISO 6400

Photo by Thibault Roland. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 300-sec., f/10, ISO 100

Photo by Jude Allen. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master.

Photo by Drew Geraci. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 70-200mm f/2.8 G Master II. 1/2500-sec., f/2.8, ISO 100

Photo by Rachel Jones Ross. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master.

Photo by Michael Hollender. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master. 1/13-sec., f/32, ISO 400

Photo by Gary Hart. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 20-sec., f/1.8, ISO 6400

Photo by Stevin Tuchiwsky. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 1/125-sec., f/9, ISO 400

Photo by Matt Kloskowski. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master. 1/2000-sec., f/8, ISO 1000

Photo by Andy Mann. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 24-105mm f/4 G. 1/250-sec., f/7.1 ISO 800

Photo by Scott Kranz. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master.

Photo by Mahesh Thapa. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 16-35mm f/2.8 G Master.

Photo by Karl Zoltan. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 5-sec., f/5, ISO 50

Alpha-Universe-Best-Of-2021-Nate-Luebbe.jpg

Alpha-Universe-Best-Of-2021-Jess-Santos.jpg

Photo by Chris-Burkard. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 1/80-sec., f/3.2, ISO 200

As we wrap up 2021 this week, AlphaUniverse.com is looking back at another unforgettable year in photography. We asked the Sony Artisans Of Imagery and the Alpha Imaging Collective to share their most meaningful image of the year and this week we're counting down with a selection of photos and the story behind each one. In Part Three below, Artisans Of Imagery Chris Burkard, Drew Geraci, Gary Hart, Matt Kloskowski, Andy Mann, Pete McBride, Thibault Roland, Don Smith and Alpha Collective members Jude Allen, Rachel Jones Ross, Michael Hollender, Scott Kranz, Nate Luebbe, Stan Moniz, Sapna Reddy, Jess Santos, Autumn Schrock, Mahesh Thapa, Stevin Tuchiwsky and Karl Zoltan share their images from 2021 and what makes each one special to them. Stay tuned to AlphaUniverse.com all week for more.

We asked the Sony Artisans of Imagery and the Alpha Imaging Collective to share their most meaningful image of the year.

Chris Burkard

Photo by Chris-Burkard. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 1/80-sec., f/3.2, ISO 200

Photo by Chris-Burkard. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 1/80-sec., f/3.2, ISO 200

“I was in Iceland for two back to back jobs and had a few days in between them. Miraculously, just as the first project finished up, Iceland's newest volcano began to erupt. The evening was filled with phone calls, texts and emails to figure out how to safely get out and document this beautiful spectacle the next morning. I didn’t sleep at all. The next day it all came together and I spent every moment shooting images from all different angles of the volcano. This shot was taken on an Alpha 7RIV with the 24-70mm f/2.8 lens on a tripod.”

“There are a few reasons why this is my favorite image from this year. First, I feel honored and incredibly lucky to have been to Iceland for work while this randomly happened. It still feels a bit hard to believe the timing of all this. The opportunity to experience an eruption 800 years in the making during a tiny window of unplanned time, post quarantine and between work feels pretty surreal. I guess after dedicating 15 years & 43 trips to Iceland you are bound to score, and that is another reason why it is so special to me. Beyond that, I had truly never felt an experience this powerful before, and with hundreds of other people. It is hard to describe but it felt so intimate and special, which is why you can see people in the background of this image. This is a moment and photo that I will never ever forget.”

Stan Moniz

Photo by Stan Moniz. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 15-sec., f/6.3, ISO 800

Photo by Stan Moniz. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 15-sec., f/6.3, ISO 800

“Keeping a steady eye on a few weather apps I could predict with accuracy when and where this electric storm-generated in Arizona would hit the coastline of Laguna Beach. I made sure I was down there an hour before the storm arrived. I composed Seal Rock right in the middle of the frame, set the proper camera settings to prevent any overexposure in the highlight areas, and kicked in the interval shooting function firing off one frame after the next while I sat back crossing my fingers that I would capture a strike right between the rocks.”

“This moment by far is not only my favorite photo taken of 2021 but easily one of my top five images captured in my life. It’s extremely meaningful to me because this beach and park have been my go-to spot to capture the sunrise, sunset, and even astro since I moved to California. I’ve seen it all here but this storm took the cake! I remember having a conversation with friends years ago talking about how crazy It would be to see a bolt of lightning strike right between Seal rock. It seemed nearly impossible due to how rare storms like these are in this area. But on August 11 at 2:22 a.m. that dream shot became a reality.”

Autumn Schrock

Photo by Autumn Schrock. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master.

Photo by Autumn Schrock. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master.

“The hike up to this spot with my workshop crew was brutal as a storm was passing through, and we weren't even sure that we'd be able to see the mountain at all. The storm caused the temperature to drop rapidly as the sun went down, so we all huddled together to stay warm while we patiently waited for the storm to pass. Before we knew it, the clouds started to descend revealing one of the most epic views I've ever witnessed.”

“Tahoma or Mt. Rainier is an incredibly special mountain to me; it was in this national park that I discovered my love for astrophotography. I've been wanting to capture a photo like this with a cloud inversion underneath Tahoma and the Milky Way since the beginning, and on this stormy summer night it all came together even better than I had ever dreamed.”

Don Smith

Photo by Don Smith. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G + 2XTC. 1/60-sec., f/16, ISO 6400

Photo by Don Smith. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 200-600mm f/5.6-6.3 G + 2XTC. 1/60-sec., f/16, ISO 6400

"My wife Beri and I moved this year as we have become empty-nesters. We now reside in the beautiful town of Morro Bay located just off scenic Highway 1 along California's beautiful central coast. In the nearby community of Pismo Beach, the Western Monarch Butterfly has returned in near record numbers after a few years hiatus. As scientists scratch their collective heads, I grabbed my Sony a1, 200-600mm + 2x converter and captured this scene of a pocket of the butterflies cloistered high up in a eucalyptus tree. Total focal length of the lens + converter was 1200mm and the resulting image was razor sharp! The light even cooperated as a shaft of sunlight burned through the morning coastal marine layer just as I was composting this image."

"Even though my main genre of photography is landscape, I do indulge in wildlife at times. The extreme telephoto of 1200mm allowed me to show my viewers just how delicate and beautiful these creatures are. I could not have scripted the light any better as it added some drama and modeling to the flat light of the overcast that I encountered when first arriving. Timing was everything for this image and I got lucky!"

Sapna Reddy

Photo by Sapna Reddy. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 12-24mm f/4 G. 1-sec., f/22, ISO 100

Photo by Sapna Reddy. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 12-24mm f/4 G. 1-sec., f/22, ISO 100

"This image was captured while I was conducting a workshop in Iceland last month. For a very brief period the storm clouds parted and the mountain was illuminated. Hoping for a rainbow I was set up with the Sony 12-24mm f/4 G with the Sony Alpha 7R III. When the rainbow appeared, I waited for the waves to wash the sand and retreat for the reflection to appear. This is a single exposure. 1-sec., f/22, ISO 100."

"My father has always been the wind beneath my wings. He has taught me to dream big and be passionate and diligent on the path to achieving my dreams. When he passed away in April my world went dark. The grief was incapacitating and I found it difficult to function. As a physician I have seen death play  out many times, especially through the Pandemic.  But the loss of a loved one is what gave me the insight for what that grief actually feels like.  Photography and the time spent in solitude in nature is what helped me to cope with the grief. To remain functional as a physician, and to have even more empathy for families facing loss, and to be more resilient . I was aware of the healing power of Nature and art, and this event reinforced that in my life. When we arrived at Vestrahorn the sky was completely overcast and it was raining. The wind was fierce and kicked up the sand into our eyes. I decided to stay and wait and hope for better light. When that rainbow appeared I felt it was a sign. A promise of calm after storms, of joy after sadness, of peace after pain. My father is now my guardian angel and every time I see a rainbow I know we are smiling together again."

Pete McBride

Photo by Pete-McBride. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 25-sec., f/5, ISO 10000

Photo by Pete-McBride. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 25-sec., f/5, ISO 10000

“After the rush of tourists and influencers departed this iconic landmark, I waited for the quiet of the winter night to settle in and then I found an angle where the arch mimicked the arcing Milky Way above – which this sandstone monument has looked up at for millions of years. It took me a while to safely find this unique angle on an otherwise heavily photographed natural arch.”

“This image reminds me that deep time keeps arcing forward and will continue long after our pixels have come and gone. It also shows magical power and fragility of silence in nature for me – something that is becoming rare and endangered in our bustling world.”

Thibault Roland

Photo by Thibault Roland. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 300-sec., f/10, ISO 100

Photo by Thibault Roland. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 300-sec., f/10, ISO 100

“This picture was taken with a technique called long exposure (LE), which uses a very slow shutter speed to blur out every moving object in the picture. To shoot such a LE during the day time, I needed to use a very strong neutral density filter (an ND16 which acted very much like sunglasses), as well as a tripod and a remote shutter trigger. The five-minute long exposure turned the moving clouds into very nice and contrasty streaks and the water into a mirror that reflects the shadows of the sea stacks beautifully!”

“I took this image at one of my favorite spots along the Oregon Coast: Cannon Beach. It is one of the first locations I went to years ago as I was driving along the coast and it was one of the main reasons that I decided to move to Oregon permanently. Since then, I’ve gone back there many many times, and it always brings me back to this fateful day when I saw it for the first time and felt such a deep connection with the place.”

Drew Geraci

Photo by Drew Geraci. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 70-200mm f/2.8 G Master II. 1/2500-sec., f/2.8, ISO 100

Photo by Drew Geraci. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 70-200mm f/2.8 G Master II. 1/2500-sec., f/2.8, ISO 100

“I ventured out into the heart of Yellowstone this winter in search of wild Bison and when I found them it was the most magical moment I've had in a long time.”

“Between the struggles of owning a business during COVID and trying to maintain my mental health, seeing these gentle (but deadly) creatures up close and personal truly made my heart soar. It filled me up with more hope for the future.”

Rachel Jones Ross

Photo by Rachel Jones Ross. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master.

Photo by Rachel Jones Ross. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master.

“​​This is a shot I had imagined for a very long time. The thing is, it’s almost impossible to get. The road to Moraine Lake closes just after Canadian Thanksgiving every year, typically after the first big snowfall. This year it closed a few days early. After the road closes its a 25 km hike out and back. The second big obstacle is that at this latitude (51° N), aurora activity must be very strong (Kp6 or higher) to see the bands of light and colour when looking toward the valley of the ten peaks. And, when the lake does begin to freeze, chances are it will quickly become snow covered.”

“It was a gamble to hike here on a night when it would have been a spectacular show looking north (the aurora was forecast to hit Kp6) but I’m so glad we took the chance. There was no ice on the lake shore when we arrived. By morning the entire lake had a layer of ice on it and bubbles!!! Pinch me, I can’t believe this is real!”

“The aurora was only strong enough to move south for about an hour. Although the lights were more brilliant looking north, this sky captured the experience of the night perfectly. It was cold, but not uncomfortably so…the air was crisp, fresh snow lay on the peaks, and we were overwhelmed with the excitement and brilliance of it all. Moments like this are what keep me up at night, imagining what tomorrow’s adventures will be.”

Jess Santos

Alpha-Universe-Best-Of-2021-Jess-Santos.jpg

Photo by Jess Santos. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 70-200mm f/2.8 G Master (Foreground & Horse) / Sony 55mm (Sky).

“We were driving around hunting for fall colors with our workshop group. I spotted this horse grazing in a field, we had to stop! The horse rolled around for a little bit then got up, shook her mane and tail and right at that moment a little bit of sun shone down just on the horse. She turned her head to look at us then walked away and in that moment I knew I wanted to create this twilight scene. I’ve loved unicorns since I was little so I decided to give her a little horn to turn this into a fantasy scene.”

“After posting this to my Instagram account the owner of the horse saw the photo and reached out. The horse's name is Snow and she was rescued from a very grim situation, she is now living her best life in this enchanting place. It was so special to be able to connect with Snow's family to share a little magic and learn her story, she is truly a Unicorn at heart.”

Michael Hollender

Photo by Michael Hollender. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master. 1/13-sec., f/32, ISO 400

Photo by Michael Hollender. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master. 1/13-sec., f/32, ISO 400

“Solar Eclipse at Sunrise? Yes please. After the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse across the US I promised myself I need to keep chasing this phenomenon. Although the June 10th 2021 Eclipse wasn't a Total Solar Eclipse I still knew I needed to get out and at least see it. I was lucky enough to partner with some fellow NYC Photographers and the Team at the Empire State Building to get exclusive access early in the morning to (hopefully) witness this natural phenomenon.”

“The stars (literally) aligned for this shot to come together. There is no viewpoint from the ground at sea level in NYC. The coordination between fellow photographers and arguably the most epic viewpoint in NYC was a magic scenario that worked out for the shot. Planning for an eclipse image is not easy. Focus, filters, Tripods, there are so many other factors you cannot plan for like the weather and atmospheric haze. But this morning we got lucky and my sony gear was up for the challenge. The results were wild and unexpected. I've never seen the Devil's Horns on the horizon at sunrise. Also the ironic timing for the Loki premiere on Disney+ just the night before.”

Gary Hart

Photo by Gary Hart. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 20-sec., f/1.8, ISO 6400

Photo by Gary Hart. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 14mm f/1.8 G Master. 20-sec., f/1.8, ISO 6400

“With the Kilauea eruption on hiatus, I went searching for other Milky Way options on the Big Island. I've done Mauna Kea summit and found the view there spectacular, but I don't like including man-made objects, and there's not much atop Mauna Kea besides telescopes. While exploring the Puna Coast one afternoon, I ended up on a cliff above the Pacific, mesmerized by the surf exploding against black volcanic rock. Checking the azimuth of the coastline here, I found that the Milky Way would align perfectly shortly after sunset.”

“Rain was in the forecast for my last night on the island, but I decided to head down the coast and hope. With one eye on the clouds moving up from the south, I watched the Milky Way emerge from the growing darkness and considered a challenge I hadn’t anticipated: while the coastline stretching beneath me was spectacular, the Milky Way at Hawaii's low latitude is quite high in the sky. Could I include both in my frame? Fortunately, my new Sony 14mm f/1.8 GM lens provided more than enough field of view to do both the coast and the Milky Way justice. Perched at cliff's edge, my Sony Alpha 7S III and I managed about 30 minutes of quality photography between complete darkness and the storm's arrival.”

“I love astrophotography, and Hawaii has always had a special place in my heart because Kilauea is the site of my first true Milky Way success. In fact, photographing the Milky Way is a prime reason I visit Hawaii every September. But when Kilauea's eruption ended just before my 2018 visit, I had to look for alternate Milky Way locations for subsequent visits. Worse still, due to the pandemic, I lost 2020 completely. Returning this year, I was especially determined to have a Milky Way success on my favorite Hawaiian island. Not only did I find a location that exceeded my most optimistic hopes, the sky above the (often cloudy) Puna Coast opened just enough for the stars to shine through. Putting an exclamation point on this unforgettable evening was that I was able to share it with my workshop group, who were as thrilled as I was.”

Matt Kloskowski 

Photo by Matt Kloskowski. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master. 1/2000-sec., f/8, ISO 1000

Photo by Matt Kloskowski. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master. 1/2000-sec., f/8, ISO 1000

"While out shooting from a boat one morning, we came upon a pair of Barred owls that had come out from some thick trees, and into the open. Since owls are typically nocturnal (but do come out during the day at times as well), it's a little harder here in Florida to capture photos of them flying. So we grabbed this opportunity to wait to see if they decided to fly from one perch to another. After a while they did just that and I was able to capture this photo that displays the wonderful patterns and size of this raptor."

"The photo is meaningful to me because it was my first photo of an owl in flight. I've been out for countless hours trying to photograph them, only to come back with nothing. They're a bit hard to find, so capturing nice photos of them is hard. Capturing a nice photo of them flying, and in good light, is even harder."

Nate Luebbe

Alpha-Universe-Best-Of-2021-Nate-Luebbe.jpg

Photo by Nate Luebbe. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 400mm f/2.8 G Master.

“At a remote lodge on the shores of the Hudson Bay in Manitoba, I was fortunate enough to finally see a mother polar bear with a cub less than a year old. Armed with my trusty Sony A1 and the 400mm f/2.8 (plus magnificent lighting conditions), I was able to capture what is easily my favorite image of this year, but potentially my favorite of my entire career.”

“I've spent nearly a full month in the arctic tracking polar bears. While I've been very fortunate to have had some incredible encounters, I've never before seen a cub. Since my heart hasn't yet hardened into a lump of coal I of course love seeing baby animals, and young polar bears are easily the cutest animal of all time. Spending two full hours watching this young one learn from his mother is hands-down the highlight of my year.”

Stevin Tuchiwsky

Photo by Stevin Tuchiwsky. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 1/125-sec., f/9, ISO 400

Photo by Stevin Tuchiwsky. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 1/125-sec., f/9, ISO 400

“We came to this spot three times, each time having a different condition of light that transformed it in a unique way. On this morning we had an incredible sunrise, but as the sun began to get higher in the horizon the fog burned off and lit the valley of coloured trees, leaving an incredible view to capture.”

“This was my first major trip since the world pandemic. It was so refreshing to experience my favourite season in one of my favourite places.”

Jude Allen

Photo by Jude Allen. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master.

Photo by Jude Allen. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master.

“I opened my front door and saw crazy amounts of lightning so I jumped in my car and scrambled around to find a good comp to try and catch some on camera. This was the second spot I ended up at and was the first shot I took right after I set up my camera.”

“This is my favorite image because it's actually my first lightning capture that I'm really proud of and also the feeling of excitement that I got when I caught the image. It reminded me why I started photography and to keep going because something new and exciting can always happen but you have to put yourself out there to increase those chances.”

Andy Mann

Photo by Andy Mann. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 24-105mm f/4 G. 1/250-sec., f/7.1 ISO 800

Photo by Andy Mann. Sony Alpha 7S III. Sony 24-105mm f/4 G. 1/250-sec., f/7.1 ISO 800

“This is the world famous Darwin Arch in Galapagos Islands – a world Heritage site. A few weeks later the arch collapsed making the image the last time I or many others would ever see it. It's rarely photographed from the side angle which shows the powerful waves beating it, which would prove its match in the end.”

Scott Kranz

Photo by Scott Kranz. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master.

Photo by Scott Kranz. Sony Alpha 1. Sony 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master.

"A solo hike through a fog-filled forest turned into complete solitude upon a mountain summit above the marine layer of clouds blanketing the Puget Sound. Looking to the Southeast, a single mountain – Tahoma (also known as Mount Rainier) – stood tall above the clouds."

"It represents the magical and unique moments that I can experience in nature, each of which build my deep connection with this local landscape here in Washington State."

Mahesh Thapa

Photo by Mahesh Thapa. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 16-35mm f/2.8 G Master.

Photo by Mahesh Thapa. Sony Alpha 7R IV. Sony 16-35mm f/2.8 G Master.

“It was a cold and stormy day when I made the trip out to North Cascades National Park. The roads were icy and my car was the only one for miles. Just before State Route 20’s closure point, I pulled off the road and walked a small trail to capture this amazing scene.”

“This was the first time in many years that I had made a trip to North Cascades National Park. It was a lovely sunset evening and I had the entire place to myself. It allowed me to appreciate nature’s harsh and rugged beauty as a gift to all of us.”

Karl Zoltan

Photo by Karl Zoltan. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 5-sec., f/5, ISO 50

Photo by Karl Zoltan. Sony Alpha 7R III. Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 G Master. 5-sec., f/5, ISO 50

“I love to share my love of nature with everyone, especially my family.  A few times a year I take one of my children on a one on one road trip to have our special time together with nature. My son and I did the Yosemite Loop to capture autumn colors on electric bikes to have a unique Yosemite experience.”

“This was one of those shots that stood out from the rest and captured the power of Yosemite. This shot is meaningful to me because it captured a moment in time that I shared with my son.”

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